REVIEW: The Death of Stalin

4 Stars (4 / 5)

What do we do when life imitate art to the extent that it renders art redundant?

Well, in short, you look for relevancy elsewhere.

With Trump still in the White House and Brexit still apparently going ahead, the world is too absurd in itself to get much mileage out of trying to take it further.…

The Purge: Election Year has some great visuals but a rickety social platform

2 Stars (2 / 5)

The Purge: Election Year is a film that’s more intriguing as a product of its time than as a work of cinema.

Setting its usual flurry of vigilantism against the backdrop of a Presidential election is an inspired choice – especially one as incendiary as this – but, other than which, it’s just business as usual for the franchise.…

Elvis & Nixon, if not quite kingly, certainly won’t leave you feeling crook

3 Stars (3 / 5)

How do you a find a new take on not one but two of the most imitated figures in modern history?

From Forrest Gump to Bubba Ho-Tep, Secret Honour to X-Men: Days of Future Past, not to mention the cavalcade of films that bear their names, Elvis Presley and Richard Nixon are probably better known to us as personas than in person; partly by design, of course. 

He Named Me Malala captures its subject’s achievement but misses out on the full story

3 Stars (3 / 5)

 

What were you doing when you were seventeen? If your answer is “Taking the President of Nigeria to task over his failure to secure the return of kidnapped schoolgirls from Boko Haram”, then you must be Malala Yousafzai.

Rubble Kings: a Bronx story of hope amid blood and strife

3 Stars (3 / 5)

 

“Warriors, come out to play-yay.”

You’ve know David Patrick Kelly’s sing-song mockery, even if you’ve never seen the film it’s in. With its gritty, lurid depiction of costumed gang warfare in ‘70s New York, The Warriors seems like a film born for cult stardom.…

Suffragette is a worthy but overly respectable

3.5 Stars (3.5 / 5)

 

As with The Imitation Game, which kicked off last year’s London Film Festival, Suffragette — another period drama — is a quintessential work of British cinema. It too tells an important story.

Instead of the huts of Bletchley Park, we find ourselves at an East End laundry circa 1913, the workplace of Maud Watts (Carey Mulligan) and dozens of other industrious women.…

Selma passionately documents the coming of a change

4.5 Stars (4.5 / 5)

 

Why was Selma largely overlooked by The Academy?

Given its pedigree, it should, by most standards, have been a lock. What then? Could it be backlash from last year’s choice of Best Picture – have voters grown tired of slavery and segregation?…

The Interview is less the end of the world as we know it and more just business as usual for Rogen & Franco

2.5 Stars (2.5 / 5)

 

If ever a film came close to ending the world, The Interview was it.

Admittedly it’s hard to tell how much is just North Korea posturing – they do that a lot, posture – but the impact, both fascinating (the Sony leaks) and terrifying (the threat of terror attacks), is undeniable.…

The Riot Club is, worryingly, a bit of a blast

An elite club populated by the best and brightest – or at least the richest and most (literally) entitled – of Oxford University; banned from campus and every nearby venue for their wild and destructive behavior; young men groomed for power, who grow up believing that money can buy them anything, including immunity from the law.

Anchorman 2: broadcasting hilarity or just dead air?

2.5 Stars (2.5 / 5)

 

It’s been a decade since the original Anchorman regaled us with the exploits of the scotch-guzzling, self-aggrandizing Ron Burgundy and his motley news team.

Having acquired cult status thanks to its endless quotability – “That escalated quickly”, “I love lamp”, etc., etc.…